Travelling with mobility aids and other assistive devices : A guide

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1. Purpose

This guide explains the requirements in the Accessible Transportation for Persons with Disabilities Regulations (ATPDR) regarding the use of mobility aids and other assistive devices by persons with disabilities. In particular, this guide describes:

  • What mobility aids and other assistive devices are covered by the ATPDR;
  • Obligations of transportation service providers concerning:
    • Services for travellers who use mobility aids and other assistive devices;
    • The accessibility of transportation equipment and terminals for travellers who use mobility aids and other assistive devices;
    • Publishing information on services and related conditions;
    • Retaining information and documentation for future trips; and
    • Personnel training
  • Responsibilities of travellers who use mobility aids and other assistive devices; and
  • Tips for travellers who use mobility aids and other assistive devices.

Transportation service providers not covered by the ATPDR may have other obligations regarding the use of mobility aids and other assistive devices by persons with disabilities. For more information consult For more information consult Accessible transportation guides - Introduction .

This is not a legal document. The explanations and definitions it provides are for general guidance purposes only. The obligations for transporting mobility and other assistive devices can be found in the ATPDR, Part 1 and reflected in Annex A of this guide. In case of differences between this guide and legislation or regulations, the legislation and regulations prevail.

2. Mobility aids and other assistive devices covered by the ATPDR

The ATPDR contain requirements that transportation service providers must meet to ensure that persons who have mobility aids or other assistive devices can travel with these.

Mobility aid means any manual or electric wheelchair, scooter, boarding chair, walker, cane, crutch, prosthesis or other aid that is specially designed to assist a person with a disability with a need related to mobility.

Assistive device means any medical device, mobility aid, communication aid or other aid that is specially designed to assist a person with a disability with a need related to their disability.

3. Obligations relating to services for travellers who use mobility aids and other assistive devices

Transportation that is accessible to persons with disabilities respects principles of equality, inclusion and dignity. A traveller's mobility aid, or other assistive device, is essential to their independence, safety and comfort during their travel.

The ATPDR requirements concerning mobility aids and other assistive devices reflect these principles and set out obligations for carriers, terminal operators, the Canadian Air Transport Security Authority, and the Canada Border Services Agency.

Carriers — Services for passengers travelling with mobility aids

Carriers are required to provide the services listed below to a passenger who uses a mobility aid or other assistive device. Providing these services, in some cases, depends on the passenger fulfilling certain conditions; for example, requesting services in advance (see Advance Notice/Supporting Documentation Requesting Services for Persons with Disabilities: A Guide) or providing information/documents, such as written instructions for the disassembly and reassembly of a mobility aid (see Section 6).

Allow passengers to keep their mobility aids as long as possible

Carriers are required to permit passengers to retain their mobility aids until it becomes necessary to store them. In some cases - such as when a mobility aid doesn't need to be disassembled for storage, because it is foldable, light or easy to store for example — this could mean that a passenger can remain in their mobility aid until they board at the gate. In other cases, they may have to transfer out of their mobility aid sooner (for example, at check-in) to allow enough time for the carrier to move their mobility aid through the terminal to the baggage loading area, and to then disassemble, package and load the mobility aid safely prior to departure.

Assist passengers who are not independently mobile

If a passenger who is in a wheelchair (or any other device) in which they are not independently mobile is waiting at a terminal for departure after checking in or in order to transfer to another segment of their trip, carrier personnel must:

  • Provide the passenger with a place to wait that is close to personnel who are available to provide assistance if needed; and
  • Periodically ask the passenger whether they need any assistance and provide that assistance.

Transport mobility aids as priority baggage

Carriers must transport mobility aids needed during travel as priority baggage. This may require removing other cargo or baggage from storage if necessary to make room for the storage of a mobility aid.

Carriers are also required to:

  • Disassemble and package a mobility aid if necessary to store it and to unpackage and reassemble it on arrival at the passenger's destination; and
  • Promptly return the mobility aid to the passenger on arrival at their destination.

Note:Mobility aid batteries may need to be removed and packaged separately to ensure they can be transported safely. Carrier personnel must ensure, as part of reassembling a mobility aid, that batteries that were removed for transport are reattached and operational before returning the aid to the passenger.

Carriers can refuse to transport a mobility aid if:

  • The weight or size of the mobility aid exceeds the capacity of boarding equipment such as lifts and ramps (applicable to aircraft, trains, ferries and buses);
  • The combined weight of a passenger who must remain in their mobility aid in order to board and the weight of the mobility aid exceeds the capacity of the boarding equipment (applicable to trains, ferries and buses);
  • The doors to baggage compartments (applicable to aircraft, trains, and buses) are too small for the mobility aid;
  • The turning radii of all cars are too small for the mobility aid (applicable to trains);
  • The size of the baggage compartments is too small for the mobility aid (applicable to aircraft and buses); or
  • Transportation of the mobility aid would jeopardize aircraft airworthiness. (Note: this includes considerations which affect the safe operation of an aircraft, such as the weight of cargo and balancing this weight to maintain proper control and stability).

However, carriers that refuse to carry a mobility aid must:

  • At the time of the refusal, tell the passenger why their mobility aid was not accepted and provide this in writing within the next 10 days; and
  • Let the passenger know about alternative trips operated by the carrier to the same destination on which their mobility aid can be transported, and offer to book this for the passenger at the lesser of the fare for the original trip and the fare for the alternative trip.

Example: An airline advises Ms. Smith that it cannot transport her mobility aid because the aircraft's cargo door is too small for her mobility aid. The airline, however, informs Ms. Smith that it will be operating a flight to the same destination the next day using an aircraft that can accommodate her mobility aid. The airline also informs Ms. Smith that, although the fare for the new flight is higher, she'll be charged the fare for the original flight. With Ms. Smith's agreement, the airline makes a reservation for Ms. Smith on the alternative flight.

Recommended practice: Reservation agents should obtain information from a passenger on the weight and dimensions of their mobility aid and ask whether there are any parts that can be removed or collapsed for storage. Information should also be obtained on the type and number of batteries that need to be transported and passengers should be advised of any restrictions or special packaging requirements.

When there's been a change in transportation equipment — especially when the replacement equipment is smaller — carriers should immediately contact passengers who are travelling with mobility aids, to reconfirm that their aids can be transported on the alternative equipment. This avoids passengers going to the terminal on the day of departure only to be told that there's been a change in equipment and their mobility aids can no longer be transported.

Store mobility aids on board transportation equipment

Rail and marine carriers must permit a passenger who uses a mobility aid to store it on the train or ferry. Each train must have at least one storage space and each deck of a ferry must also have one. Rail and marine carriers must store mobility aids in a manner that protects them from damage, including by using an anchoring system or by placing them in an area that is not intended for use by passengers.

Airlines must make a reasonable effort to permit passengers who use walkers or manual folding wheelchairs to store them in the aircraft cabin. Similarly, bus carriers must make a reasonable effort to permit passengers who use walkers or manual folding wheelchairs to store them in the passenger section of the bus. Where this is not possible, those aids must be stored in baggage compartments.

Take measures when a mobility aid is damaged, destroyed or lost during transport

Carriers must, without delay and at their own expense, take the following measures when a mobility aid that is not retained by a passenger during transport is damaged, destroyed, lost or not returned to the passenger within the usual time frame after they arrive at their destination:

  • Provide the passenger with a temporary replacement mobility aid that meets their needs and allow them to use it until their mobility aid is returned to them or is repaired or replaced, or until the passenger is reimbursed for the loss of the mobility aid;
  • Reimburse the passenger for any expenses they incurred because the mobility aid was damaged, destroyed or lost, or because it was not returned to them when they arrived at their destination;
  • Arrange for the repair of a mobility aid that has been damaged and promptly return it to the passenger or, if it cannot be adequately repaired:
    • Replace the damaged aid with the same model or, if that is not available, with a model that meets the passenger's needs and has features and qualities equivalent to those of the damaged aid, or
    • Reimburse the passenger for the full replacement cost of the aid; and
  • In the case of a destroyed mobility aid, a mobility aid that is not returned to the passenger within the usual time frame after they arrive at their destination, or a mobility aid that is not returned to them within 96 hours (for air travel) or 72 hours (for rail, ferry or bus travel):
    • Replace the destroyed or lost mobility aid with the same model or, if that is not available, with a model that meets the passenger's needs and has features and qualities equivalent to those of the destroyed or lost aid, or
    • Reimburse the passenger for the full replacement cost of the aid

Note:Carriers must ensure that any temporary or permanent replacement mobility aid meets the passenger's needs. This should be determined in discussion with the passenger and assumptions should not be made about the passenger's mobility needs.

Although a carrier is obligated to replace a lost mobility aid within the specified time frame following the passenger's arrival at their destination (72 hours for bus, ferry and rail travel and 96 hours for air travel), in cases where the mobility aid is only misplaced but not permanently lost, the passenger may voluntarily accept a carrier's offer to continue using a temporary replacement mobility aid beyond this time frame until their own mobility aid can be returned to them. Passengers whose mobility aids are highly customized may prefer this alternative to being provided with a new mobility aid.

Offer the option of a special declaration of interest for international air travel

When a person who wants to travel with their mobility aid makes a reservation with an airline for an international flight, the airline must advise them of the option to make a special declaration of interest. A special declaration of interest sets out the monetary value of the mobility aid and a description of its features in case of destruction, loss, damage or delay.

The airline must permit a passenger to make a special declaration of interest at any time before the mobility aid is taken from the passenger for storage in the aircraft’s baggage compartment.

An airline that operates an international flight must publish a notice on its website that passengers who use mobility aids have the option to make a special declaration of interest.

For domestic travel, airlines should be aware that the CTA's Air Passenger Protection Regulations (APPR) apply the provisions of the Montreal Convention on lost, damaged and delayed baggage to domestic flights. For more information on the APPR baggage requirements, please see Baggage Requirements for Domestic Services: A Guide.

Carriers — Services for passengers travelling with other assistive devices

Common assistive devices used by persons with disabilities are canes, crutches, communication devices (for example, a speech generating device which translates typed messages into digitized speech), orthotic positioning devices (used to support and position a person who has postural problems), and portable oxygen concentrators.

Carriers must allow a passenger to keep a small assistive device with them on board if they need it during travel. Providing these services, in some cases, depends on the passenger fulfilling certain conditions (see Section 6).

Recommendation:

Carriers are subject to numerous safety rules and regulations, some of which can impact on the transportation of assistive devices.

Reservation agents should obtain information from a passenger on their assistive device, including whether it uses batteries or needs an onboard power supply, and advise the passenger of any restrictions.

Publishing information on transporting mobility aids and other assistive devices

  • A notice listing their obligations concerning the transportation of mobility aids and other assistive devices (specifically, which ATPDR provisions apply); and
  • The services they offer to passengers travelling with mobility aids and other assistive devices and any conditions on those services.

Carriers must publish on their website the maximum weight and dimensions of mobility aids that each make and model of its transportation equipment is capable of transporting.

Carriers without a website must publish information in another way that passengers can easily find, such as in a brochure. This requirement applies to all publishing obligations noted in this guide.

Retain information and documents for future trips

If a carrier requests information or documents from a person who wants to travel with a mobility aid or other assistive device, the carrier must offer to retain an electronic copy for at least three years.

This avoids a person having to provide the same information or documents each time they travel with the carrier.

Note: A carrier may ask a person to confirm, at the time of a new reservation, if information or documents already on file about the person's mobility aid or other assistive device have changed since they were provided to the carrier.

Terminal operators — Services for travellers who use mobility aids

Terminal operators must ensure that certain services are accessible to travellers using mobility aids or other assistive devices.

Information on the applicability of these requirements to terminal operators can be found in Transportation service providers covered by the Accessible Transportation for Persons with Disabilities Regulations: A guide.

Curbside assistance

Terminal operators must provide curbside assistance to travellers using wheelchairs by assisting them with their wheelchair (or by providing one if needed):

  • To get from the curbside zone outside to the check-in area inside or to get to a carrier representative if there is no check-in area; and
  • To get from the general public area inside to the curbside zone outside after the traveller has landed/disembarked at the terminal.

Note: At some terminals, carriers choose to provide curbside assistance themselves, rather than having the terminal operator provide the service. If this is the case, terminal operators must still make sure the requirements outlined above are met. More information can be found in Curbside assistance: A guide .

Ensure accessible ground transportation from terminals

The ATPDR recognize that, like many travellers, those with disabilities often rely on ground transportation to be able to complete their trip.

Terminal Operators that have an agreement with a service provider for the provision of ground transportation from the terminal — including by taxi, limousine, bus or rental vehicle — must ensure that the transportation is accessible to a person travelling with a mobility aid (or any other assistive device), including by using vehicles that can carry non-folding or non-collapsible mobility aids. The terminal operator must ensure that there are rental vehicles that are equipped with hand-control systems.

Publish information on curbside assistance and accessible ground transportation

Terminal operators must publish on their website information about the location of the curbside zone and how to request curbside assistance, and information on accessible ground transportation.

Canadian Air Transport Security Authority (CATSA)

CATSA must, when screening a traveller who has an assistive device (including a mobility aid):

  • Make a reasonable effort to simultaneously screen the traveller’s assistive device;
  • Immediately return an assistive device that has been removed for separate screening to the traveller after it has been screened; and
  • Offer a chair to a traveller whose mobility aid has been removed for separate screening, while the mobility aid is being screened.

Note: The screening of travellers with mobility aids or other assistive devices may involve special procedures such as swabbing for explosive trace detection. CATSA provides useful information for travellers with disabilities about the screening process on its website, including information on planning a trip and what to expect at screening checkpoints. Travellers who use mobility aids or other assistive devices may wish to consult the CATSA website prior to travel to familiarize themselves with the screening process.

4. Personnel training obligations

Carriers, terminal operators, the Canadian Air Transport Security Authority and the Canada Border Services Agency must ensure that their personnel who interact with the public, or participate in making decisions or developing policies and procedures that specifically affect travellers who use mobility aids or other assistive devices, receive training on:

  • the assistive devices that are commonly used;
  • the different types of mobility aids;
  • the requirements and appropriate methods for transporting and storing mobility aids, including the disassembling, packaging, unpackaging and reassembling of mobility aids; and
  • using, or assisting a traveller with a disability in using, special equipment, including an on-board electrical power supply and a device for the connection of on-board auxiliary respirator systems.

5. Obligations relating to the accessibility of transportation equipment and terminals to travellers who use a mobility aid

A traveller who uses a mobility aid generally wants to be able to remain in it as much as possible given its importance to their independence, dignity, safety and comfort.

The Canadian Standards Association's (CSA) CAN/CSA-B651-18 Accessible design for the built environment (CSA B651-18) contains requirements for making buildings and other facilities accessible to persons with various disabilities, including those relating to a person's mobility.

Many of the requirements in CSA B651-18 are based on the concept of a "manual wheelchair" and reflect criteria designed to permit persons using their wheelchairs, as well other assistive devices such as walkers and crutches, to access and manoeuver within a space and use the features that it contains.

The ATPDR provisions applicable to transportation equipment and terminals incorporate relevant requirements in CSA B651-18.

Note: Power wheelchairs and scooters generally have longer footprints than manual wheelchairs. The ATPDR provisions represent minimum requirements which carriers and terminal operators can (and sometimes, should) choose to exceed.

All Canadian carriers are required to meet the technical requirements in the ATPDR found in Part 3, and terminal operators are required to meet the technical requirements found in Part 4 for terminals located in Canada. Information on the applicability of these requirements for all modes can be found in Transportation service providers covered by the Accessible Transportation for Persons with Disabilities Regulations: A guide .

Transportation equipment

Aircraft

Aircraft have obvious physical constraints and inherent structural limitations which mean that space is limited, such that the ATPDR requirements relate to the use of on-board wheelchairs as opposed to passenger-owned wheelchairs that may be larger or more difficult to accommodate.

Trains

Trains are required to have mobility aid spaces to enable passengers to remain in their mobility aids during travel in addition to providing on-board wheelchairs for passengers whose mobility aids are stored.

Trains are required to meet requirements in CSA B651-18 to permit a passenger using a wheelchair to access, and travel between, adjacent areas which are required to be wheelchair-accessible, such as a wheelchair-accessible cabin, food service area, wheelchair-accessible washroom, and a mobility aid space. Trains must also meet CSA B651-18 requirements applicable for persons using mobility aids relating to such things as doors and operating controls.

Ferries

The ATPDR require that most areas and amenities on a ferry be accessible to passengers using mobility aids and meet applicable CSA B651-18 requirements. Ferries, relative to other transportation equipment, provide ample space for passengers who use mobility aids and, consequently, most passengers choose to remain in their mobility aid during travel. However, in recognition that some passengers prefer to store their mobility aid, the ATPDR require ferries to have on-board wheelchairs and storage for mobility aids.

Buses

Buses are required to have mobility aid spaces to enable passengers to remain in their mobility aids during travel. Alternatively, passengers can store these in baggage compartments. The ATPDR also require buses to have wheelchair-accessible washrooms where space permits and contain specifications regarding the placement of operating controls and grab bars, and handholds and stanchions to meet the needs of passengers who remain in their wheelchairs.

Terminals

Terminal operators are required to meet all of the requirements in CSA B651-18, with some exceptions, including requirements regarding bathtubs, viewing spaces in assembly areas, and residential accommodation. Terminal operators are also required to meet requirements applicable to lifts, ramps, stairs, and light-rail trains and shuttle buses operating at terminals.

6. Responsibilities of travellers who use a mobility aid or other assistive device

The ATPDR recognize that carriers are responsible for the safety of their passengers and personnel and that this can require them to establish travel conditions, including for passengers who use a mobility aid or other assistive device. There are things a person who wants to travel with their mobility aid or device can do to help avoid problems during their trip

Provide advance notice

A carrier may require a person who intends to travel with their mobility aid or other assistive device to provide it with advance notice.

Generally speaking, a person with a disability will have to make a request for services at least 48 hours before their departure. They can do this by contacting the carrier directly; for example, by phone, email or through their website. Some carriers may also refer passengers to a specialized department such as a medical desk.

However, if the carrier requires documents or information from a person to provide them the service, a carrier may need up to 96-hour notice before departure to assess the request. In this situation, the person will have 48 hours to provide the documents and/or information the carrier has requested. Once the person has provided this, the carrier may take up to 48 additional hours to assess the request.

If the person with a disability gives advance notice but the information or documents provided are insufficient or the notice period includes a day that is a weekend day or holiday, the carrier may not be able to complete its assessment of the request. In these cases, the carrier may not be required to provide the service. For this reason, it is important that travellers provide the requested documents or information and make every effort to give advance notice that includes two full business days.

Note: A carrier is required to make a reasonable effort to transport a mobility aid or other assistive device even if the person does not provide advance notice or submit the information or documents required by the carrier.

Why it is important to provide advance notice: Providing a carrier with adequate advance notice about the need to travel with a mobility aid or other assistive device will enable it to ensure that the aid can be carried on the transportation equipment that's scheduled for use on the trip and, if this isn't possible, advise the passenger what alternative trips are available for travelling with the mobility aid or assistive device. The carrier can also explain any restrictions; for example, on the number or types of batteries due to safety reasons, and whether there is a power supply on board the transportation equipment that can be used for an assistive device.

Provide Information for the disassembly and reassembly of a mobility aid and arrive early

A carrier may require a passenger whose mobility aid needs to be disassembled and packaged in order for it to be stored, and unpackaged and reassembled upon arrival at the passenger's destination, to:

  • Provide the carrier with written instructions for the disassembly and reassembly of the mobility aid; and
  • Check in or arrive at the boarding area before the standard time for check-in or
  • Provide medical certificates and other information and documents.

When a person intends to travel with their mobility aid or other assistive device, the carrier may require that they provide any information or documents that are reasonably necessary to permit the carrier to assess the person’s request; for example, written instructions for the disassembly and reassembly of a mobility aid or a medical certificate for some devices (for example, portable oxygen concentrators).

7. Travel tips for passengers who travel with a mobility aid or other assistive device

There are things a person who wants to travel with their mobility aid or other assistive device can do to help avoid problems during their trip:

  • Contact the carrier as soon as possible (a carrier may require between 48 and 96 hours advance notice) to find out what information or documents are required; for example, written instructions for disassembly and reassembly of a mobility aid. The carrier may already have this in an electronic file if it was provided for a previous trip and the passenger asked that it be kept for future reference (at least 3 years);
  • Provide information to the carrier on the dimensions and weight of a mobility aid, the type of batteries it has, and written instructions for disassembly and reassembly;
  • Ask the carrier whether a passenger who is travelling with a mobility aid needs to arrive at check-in and the boarding area earlier than the usual time;
  • Ask the carrier about the availability of power sources for using an assistive device on board the transportation equipment or, when the device uses batteries, about any restrictions on the type or number of batteries that can be transported;
  • Ask the air carrier about making a special declaration of interest for a mobility aid when travelling outside of Canada or their rights under the Air Passenger Protection Regulations related to lost, damaged and delayed baggage for travel within Canada;
  • Inspect a mobility aid for damage upon arrival at the destination terminal and, if it is damaged, complete a claim and provide it to carrier personnel before leaving the terminal; and
  • Contact the terminal operator for information on accessible ground transportation for a mobility aid.

8. We're here to help

For more information and guidance about accessible travel and the CTA’s dispute resolution services, please contact us at info@otc-cta.gc.ca .

Annex A: Obligations in the Accessible Transportation for Persons with Disabilities Regulations concerning mobility aids and other assistive devices

Provisions in the Accessible Transportation for Persons with Disabilities Regulations applicable to assistance provided to passengers travelling with a mobility aid or another assistive device are set out in Part 1 (Communication of Information to Persons with Disabilities and Personnel Training for the Assistance of Persons with Disabilities); Part 2 (Service Requirements Applicable to Carriers); Part 3, Divisions 1 – 4 (Technical Requirements Applicable to Carriers); Part 4, Division 1 (Service Requirements Applicable to Terminal Operators) and Division 2 (Technical Requirements Applicable to Terminal Operators); and Part 5 (Requirements Applicable to CATSA and CBSA).

Part 1

Communication

6 A transportation service provider must ensure that members of personnel who interact with passengers in the course of carrying out their functions take in account the following when communicating with a person with a disability:

...

(b) whether the person uses an assistive device to assist them to hear, see or communicate; and

Personnel training for the assistance of persons with disabilities

Interaction with public, etc.

16 (1) If a member of personnel may be required to interact with the public or to participate in making decisions or in developing policies or procedures in relation to the requirements of these Regulations, they must receive training that provides an adequate level of knowledge and skills to carry out those functions, including training with respect to the requirements of these Regulations and the policies and procedures of the transportation service provider with respect to persons with disabilities.

Contents of training

(2) The training referred to in subsection (1) must provide an adequate level of knowledge in respect of

...

(c) the various types of assistance that may be needed by persons with disabilities and the duties of the transportation service provider in relation to those needs, including

(ii) the assistive devices that are commonly used by persons with disabilities and the methods of communication that may be used by, or may facilitate communication with, persons with disabilities, such as an augmentative or alternative communication system, sign language or clear, concise and plain language

Handling mobility aids

18 If a member of personnel may be required to handle mobility aids in the course of carrying out their functions, they must receive training that provides an adequate level of knowledge and skills to carry out those functions, including training with respect to

(a) the different types of mobility aids; and

(b) the requirements and appropriate methods for transporting and storing mobility aids, including the disassembling, packaging, unpackaging and reassembling of mobility aids.

Using or assisting with special equipment

Definition of special equipment

2 In this section, special equipment includes

(a) a telecommunication device for persons who are deaf or who have any other hearing impairment;

(b) a lift, a ramp and any other level-change device;

(c) an on-board electrical power supply;

(d) a device for the connection of on-board auxiliary respirator systems;

(e) an on-board entertainment system that is accessible to persons with disabilities; and

(f) an automated self-service kiosk that is accessible to persons with disabilities.

Note: The training obligations do not apply to foreign carriers.

Part 2

Advance notice

At least 48 hours

32 (1) If a person with a disability makes a request for a service set out in this Part at least 48 hours before the scheduled time of departure, the carrier must provide the service.

Exceptions

(2) However, if a person with a disability makes a request for a service referred to in any of paragraphs 35(a), (b), (g), (i) to (l) and (n) to (r) or section 37 or 38 less than 48 hours before the scheduled time of departure, the carrier must provide the service.

Exception — certain conditions

(3) Subsection (1) does not apply if

(a) a person with a disability makes a request for a service set out in this Part, other than a service referred to in subsection (2), less than 96 hours before the scheduled time of departure;

(b) at the time that the request is made, the carrier informs the person that information or documents are required to permit the carrier to assess their request and the person must provide them within 48 hours; and

(c) either

(i) the person does not provide the information or documents required by the carrier within the period of 48 hours or the information and documents provided are not reasonably sufficient to permit the carrier to assess the request, or

(ii) the carrier is not able to complete its assessment of the request within the period of 48 hours because it includes at least one day that is not a business day.

No advance notice

(4) Despite subsections (1) and (3), the carrier must make a reasonable effort to provide a service requested by a person with a disability even if the person does not comply with a requirement set out in those subsections.

Medical certificates and other information and documents

Required information

33 (1) If a person with a disability requests a service set out in this Part, except a service referred to in any of paragraphs 35(a), (b), (g), (i) to (l) and (n) to (r) or section 37 or 38, a carrier may require that the person provide any information or documents, including a medical certificate, that are reasonably necessary to permit the carrier to assess the person’s request.

Reasonable effort

(2) A carrier must make a reasonable effort to provide a service requested by a person with a disability even if the person does not provide any information or documents that are requested by the carrier, including any information or documents that are referred to in subsection (1) or paragraph 41(2)(a) or 51(2)(a) or (b).

Service requirements applicable to transportation of mobility aids and other assistive devices

Persons not independently mobile

37 If a person with a disability who is in a wheelchair, a boarding chair or any other device in which the person is not independently mobile is waiting at a terminal for departure after check-in or in order to transfer to another segment of their trip, the carrier must ensure that members of personnel

(a) provide the person with a place to wait that is close to members of personnel who are available to provide assistance to the person; and

(b) periodically inquire about the person’s needs and attend to those needs if the services requested by the person are services that are required by this Part.

Priority baggage

40 (1) Subject to sections 44 to 47, a carrier must, on the request of a person with a disability who needs a mobility aid during travel, accept the mobility aid for transport as priority baggage.

Option to retain

(2) The carrier must permit the person to retain their mobility aid until it becomes necessary to store it.

Services

41 (1) A carrier must provide the following services to a person with a disability who uses a mobility aid:

(a) if it is necessary in order to make room for the storage of that mobility aid, removing any cargo and other baggage from storage;

(b) if the mobility aid needs to be disassembled and packaged in order to store it, disassembling and packaging the mobility aid and, on arrival at the person’s destination, unpackaging and reassembling it; and

(c) promptly returning the mobility aid to the person on arrival at the destination.

Disassembly and reassembly

(2) A carrier may require a person who requests the service referred to in paragraph (1)(b) to do any of the following:

(a) provide the carrier with written instructions for the disassembly and reassembly of the mobility aid; and

(b) check in or arrive at the boarding area before the scheduled time for check-in or boarding.

On-board storage — trains or ferries

42 A rail or marine carrier must permit a person with a disability who uses a mobility aid to store their mobility aid on board the train or ferry.

On-board storage — aircraft or buses

43 An air or bus carrier must make a reasonable effort to permit a person with a disability who uses a walker or manual folding wheelchair to store it on board the aircraft or bus.

Refused transportation — aircraft

44 An air carrier may refuse to transport a person’s mobility aid if

(a) the size of the door to the aircraft’s baggage compartment or the size of the aircraft’s baggage compartment is not large enough to accommodate the mobility aid;

(b) it would jeopardize aircraft airworthiness; or

(c) the weight or size of the mobility aid exceeds the capacity of the lift or ramp.

Refused transportation — trains

45 A rail carrier may refuse to transport a person’s mobility aid if

(a) the doorways and turning radii of every passenger rail car and the doors of every baggage car are not large enough to accommodate the mobility aid;

(b) the weight or size of the mobility aid exceeds the capacity of the lift or ramp; or

(c) the person must remain in the mobility aid in order to board the train and the combined weight of the person and the mobility aid exceeds the capacity of the lift or ramp.

Refused transportation — ferries

46 A marine carrier may refuse to transport a person’s mobility aid if

(a) the weight or size of the mobility aid exceeds the capacity of the gangway or ramp; or

(b) the person must remain in the mobility aid in order to board the ferry and the combined weight of the person and the mobility aid exceeds the capacity of the gangway or ramp.

Refused transportation — buses

47 A bus carrier may refuse to transport a person’s mobility aid if

(a) the size of the door to the bus’s baggage compartment or the size of the bus’s baggage compartment is not large enough to accommodate the mobility aid;

(b) the weight or size of the mobility aid exceeds the capacity of the baggage compartment or of the lift, ramp or bridge plate; or

(c) the person must remain in the mobility aid in order to board the bus and the combined weight of the person and the mobility aid exceeds the capacity of the lift, ramp or bridge plate.

Explanation of refusal and alternatives

48 If a carrier refuses to transport the mobility aid of a person with a disability, the carrier must

(a) at the time of the refusal, inform the person of the carrier’s reasons for refusal and, not later than 10 days after the day of the refusal, provide the person with a written notice setting out the reasons for the refusal; and

(b) advise the person of the availability of alternative trips that are provided by the carrier to the same destination and on which the mobility aid will not be refused for transport, and offer to book any such alternative trip for the person at the lesser of the fare for the original trip and the fare for the alternative trip.

Small assistive devices

49 A carrier must permit a person with a disability to bring on board and to retain any small assistive device that the person needs during travel, including a cane, crutches, a communication device, an orthotic positioning device or a portable oxygen concentrator.

Communication of information

Mobility aids — maximum weight and dimensions

56 A carrier must publish, including on its website, information about the maximum weight and dimensions of mobility aids that each make and model of its aircraft, trains, ferries or buses, as the case may be, is capable of transporting.

Damaged, destroyed or lost mobility aids

Duty of carrier

61If the mobility aid of a person with a disability is not retained by the person during transport and it is damaged, destroyed or lost during transport or is not made available to the person at the time of their arrival at their destination, the carrier must, without delay and at the carrier’s own expense,

(a) provide them with a temporary replacement mobility aid that meets their needs in relation to their mobility and that they are permitted to use until their mobility aid is returned to them or is repaired or replaced or until they are reimbursed by the carrier for the loss of the mobility aid;

(b) reimburse the person for any expenses they have incurred because the mobility aid was damaged, destroyed or lost or because it was not made available to them at the time of their arrival at their destination;

(c) in the case of a damaged mobility aid, arrange for the repair of the mobility aid and promptly return it to the person or, in the case of a damaged mobility aid that cannot be adequately repaired,

(i) replace the damaged mobility aid with the same model of mobility aid or, if the same model is not available, a model that has equivalent features and qualities as the damaged mobility aid and that meets the person’s needs in relation to their mobility, or

(ii) reimburse the person for the full replacement cost of the mobility aid; and

(d) in the case of a destroyed mobility aid or a mobility aid that is not made available to the person at the time of their arrival at their destination and that is not returned to them within, in the case of an air carrier, 96 hours after that arrival or, in the case of a train, marine or bus carrier, 72 hours after that arrival,

(i) replace the destroyed or lost mobility aid with the same model of mobility aid or, if the same model is not available, a model that has equivalent features and qualities as the destroyed or lost mobility aid and that meets the person’s needs in relation to their mobility, or

(ii) reimburse the person for the full replacement cost of the mobility aid.

Air transportation — special declaration of interest

62 (1) If a person with a disability who uses a mobility aid makes a reservation with an air carrier for transportation on an international service, the air carrier must advise the person of the option to make a special declaration of interest, under Article 22(2) of the Montreal Convention or under Article 22(2) of the Warsaw Convention, that sets out the monetary value of the mobility aid and a description of its identifying features.

Period for making special declaration

(2) The air carrier must permit a person with a disability to make the special declaration of interest at any time before the mobility aid is removed by the carrier for storage in the aircraft’s baggage compartment.

Notice on website

(3) An air carrier that operates an international service must publish, including by publishing on its website, a notice for persons with disabilities who use mobility aids that informs them of the option to make a special declaration of interest under Article 22(2) of the Montreal Convention or under Article 22(2) of the Warsaw Convention.

Part 3 — Technical requirements applicable to transportation of mobility aids and other assistive devices

Division 1: Air carriers

Lift

69 A lift that is used to assist a person with a disability, including a person in a mobility aid, to board or disembark from an aircraft must

(a) have handrails that are located on both sides of the lift and a slip-resistant surface; and

(b) be capable of supporting a minimum weight of 363 kg.

Ramp

(70) A ramp that is used to assist a person with a disability, including a person in a mobility aid, to board or disembark from an aircraft must

(a) have a contrasting colour strip that runs the full width of its bottom edge;

(b) have raised edges to prevent a mobility aid from rolling off the edge of the ramp;

(c) have a slip-resistant surface; and

(d) be capable of supporting a minimum weight of 363 kg.

On-board wheelchair

72 An on-board wheelchair that is available on an aircraft must have

(a) footrests, movable armrests, an occupant restraint device and wheel locks;

(b) a backrest of a height that permits the person using the wheelchair to be safely and easily transferred to and from a passenger seat; and

(c) a seat of a width that permits the wheelchair to be safely and easily manoeuvred on board the aircraft.

Mandatory on-board wheelchair

73 At least one on-board wheelchair must be available on an aircraft that has a wheelchair-accessible washroom.

Wheelchair-accessible washroom

78 A wheelchair-accessible washroom on an aircraft must meet the requirements set out in section 77 and must

(a) have a door or other opening to the washroom that has sufficient space in front of it and that is wide enough to allow the entry of a person using an on-board wheelchair;

(b) have sufficient space to allow a person, with assistance, to transfer to and from an on-board wheelchair and the toilet;

(c) have sufficient privacy, including with the use of retractable curtains or walls, to allow a support person or service dog to remain in the washroom with a person using the on-board wheelchair; and

(d) be equipped with faucets that are positioned to be easily usable by a person using an on-board wheelchair.

Mandatory wheelchair-accessible washroom

79 Every washroom on an aircraft must be a wheelchair-accessible washroom, unless the washroom does not have

(a) a door or other opening to the washroom that has sufficient space in front of it and that is wide enough to allow the entry of a person using an on-board wheelchair; and

(b) sufficient space to allow a person, with assistance, to transfer to and from an on-board wheelchair and the toilet.

Division 2 : Rail carriers

Step box

90 A step box that is used to assist a person with a disability to board or disembark from a train must

(a) be of sound construction;

(b) have a tread surface that is firm and slip-resistant;

(c) have a glare-free surface; and

(d) have a top outer edge that is marked by a contrasting colour strip that runs the full width of the box.

Mandatory step box

91 A rail car must be equipped with a step box if the riser height of the first or last step of any stairs that are used by passengers to board or disembark is greater than the riser height of the other steps.

Lift

92 A lift that is used to assist a person with a disability, including a person in a mobility aid, to board or disembark from a train must

(a) have handrails that are located on both sides of the lift and a slip-resistant surface; and

(b) be capable of supporting a minimum weight of 363 kg.

Ramp

93 A ramp that is used to assist a person with a disability, including a person in a mobility aid, to board or disembark from a train must

(a) have a contrasting colour strip that runs the full width of its bottom edge;

(b) have raised edges to prevent a mobility aid from rolling off the edge of the ramp;

(c) have a slip-resistant surface; and

(d) be capable of supporting a minimum weight of 363 kg.

No level boarding

94 If a rail terminal does not permit level boarding of a train and there is no lift or ramp available at the rail terminal, the train must be equipped with a lift or ramp.

Other stops

95 If a train makes a stop at any place that is not at a terminal and where passengers are permitted to board and disembark, the train must be equipped with a lift or ramp.

On-board wheelchair

97 An on-board wheelchair that is available on a train must have

(a) footrests, movable armrests, an occupant restraint device and wheel locks;

(b) a backrest of a height that permits the person using the wheelchair to be safely and easily transferred to and from a passenger seat; and

(c) a seat of a width that permits the wheelchair to be safely and easily manoeuvred on board the train.

Mandatory on-board wheelchairs

98 A train must have available on-board wheelchairs in a number that is equal to at least half of the sum of the number of mobility aid spaces on the train and the number of wheelchair-accessible cabins on the train.

Accessible path of travel

99 (1) A path of travel on a train is accessible to persons with disabilities if it meets the requirements set out in subsections (2) and (3) and in clauses 4.4.2, 5.1.1(a) to (d) and 5.1.2 of CSA B651-18.

Hall, path or turning space

(2) If access to the path of travel from an exterior door requires passage through a hall or path or requires a 90-degree or similar turn, then that hall, path or turning space must have a minimum clear width of 1,115 mm and a minimum clear diameter of 1,500 mm.

Aisle width

(3) The aisle width between passenger seats must be sufficient to accommodate an on-board wheelchair.

Mandatory accessible path of travel

100 (1) A train must have a path of travel that is accessible to persons with disabilities and that provides access to, from and between all of the following points on the train:

(a) any exterior door that is used by passengers to board or disembark;

(b) any mobility aid space or transfer seat; and

(c) any wheelchair-accessible washroom.

Wheelchair-accessible area

(2) Any area of a train that is intended for use by a person using a wheelchair, including a wheelchair-accessible cabin or a wheelchair-accessible food service area, must have a path of travel that is accessible to persons with disabilities from that area to any adjacent rail car, if that adjacent rail car contains a mobility aid space, transfer seat or wheelchair-accessible washroom.

Shower facility and cabin

(3) A train must have a path of travel that is accessible to persons with disabilities between a wheelchair-accessible shower facility and a wheelchair-accessible cabin.

Mobility aid space

104 A mobility aid space on a train must

(a) have a clear floor area of at least 815 mm by 1,650 mm;

(b) be equipped with a call button that is in a location within the reach of the person who is seated in the mobility aid space, that is tactilely discernible and colour-contrasted with its background and that is operable using minimal force; and

(c) be equipped with a table or counter for food service which, if located in a food service rail car that contains tables, meets the requirements set out in clauses 6.7.1.2 and 6.7.1.3 of CSA B651-18.

Transfer seat

105 A transfer seat on a train must be equipped with a table or counter for food service.

Mandatory mobility aid space and transfer seat

106 (1) A train must, in each class of service, have at least two adjacent mobility aid spaces and two adjacent transfer seats, as well as a number of additional mobility aid spaces and a number of additional transfer seats equal to one mobility aid space and one transfer seat for every 75 passenger seats.

Maximum of two mobility aid spaces

(2) There must be no more than two mobility aid spaces in each rail car.

Food service rail car

(3) A food service rail car that offers passenger seats must have at least two mobility aid spaces. In the case of a bi-level food service rail car, there must be at least two mobility aid spaces that are located on the lower level of the rail car.

Storage of mobility aids

107 (1) At least one rail car of a train must have a space for the storage of at least one mobility aid.

Protection from damage

(2) A mobility aid must be stored on a train in a manner that protects it from damage, including by using an anchoring system or by placing it in an area that is not intended for use by passengers.

Wheelchair-accessible washroom

111 A wheelchair-accessible washroom on a train must

(a) meet the requirements set out in clause 6.3 of CSA B651-18, except clause 6.3.1.1(a);

(b) provide a clear area of at least 1,500 mm by 1,500 mm; and

(c) be equipped with at least two call buttons or two other devices for signalling an emergency that meet the requirements set out in paragraph 110(b).

Mandatory wheelchair-accessible washroom

112 (1) Each rail car on a train that has a mobility aid space, except a food service rail car, must have at least one wheelchair-accessible washroom.

Food service rail car

(2) If a food service rail car has one or more washrooms, at least one of them must be a wheelchair-accessible washroom.

Wheelchair-accessible cabin

119 A wheelchair-accessible cabin on a train must

(a) have a clear floor area that meets the requirements set out in clause 4.1(b) of CSA B651-18;

(b) be equipped with operating controls that meet the requirements set out in clause 4.2 of CSA B651-18;

(c) meet the requirements set out in clause 4.4.2 of CSA B651-18;

(d) be equipped with an entry door that is identified by the International Symbol of Access and meets the requirements set out in clause 5.2 of CSA B651-18;

(e) be equipped with at least two call buttons or two other devices for signalling an emergency that meet the requirements of paragraph 118(1)(c); and

(f) be adjacent to a wheelchair-accessible washroom or have a path of travel adjacent to the cabin that is accessible to persons with disabilities and that provides access to a wheelchair-accessible washroom.

Mandatory wheelchair-accessible cabin

120 A train that has cabins must have at least two wheelchair-accessible cabins that are adjacent to each other.

Wheelchair-accessible shower facility

122 A wheelchair-accessible shower facility on a train must

(a) meet the requirements set out in clause 6.5 of CSA B651-18 except clauses 6.5.5.1 and 6.5.5.2;

(b) have an interior clear area of at least 900 mm by 1,500 mm;

(c) have a clear floor area in front of the shower entrance of at least 900 mm by 1,500 mm, with the 1,500 mm dimension parallel to the shower entrance; and

(d) be located near to a wheelchair-accessible cabin.

Mandatory wheelchair-accessible shower facility

123 A train that has a standard shower facility must also have at least one wheelchair-accessible shower facility.

Interior door and doorway

124 (1) An interior door and doorway on a train must meet the requirements set out in clauses 5.2.1 and 5.2.6 to 5.2.8 of CSA B651-18.

Requirements

(2) An interior door must

(a) in the case of an automatic or semi-automatic door, incorporate devices that prevent the door from closing while a person is in the doorway and, in the case of an automatic door that connects rail cars, open and close the door automatically on detecting the movement of a person toward or away from the door;

(b) be marked with visual indicators if 75% of the door’s surface is composed of a transparent material;

(c) in the case of a door to an enclosed space in an area that has no other exit doors, have a safety mechanism that is not a deadbolt and is capable of being manipulated from the outside; and

(d) in the case of a door that is intended for use by a person using a mobility aid, meet the requirements set out in clauses 4.2.2 and 5.2.2 of CSA B651-18.

Exterior door

125 An exterior door on a train must

(a) meet the requirements set out in clause 5.2.1 of CSA B651-18;

(b) have a handrail

(i) on each side of the door, fitted internally as close as is feasible to the outer wall of the rail car, or

(ii) on only one side of

(A) a doorway that is fitted with a device for boarding or disembarking, such as a lift, or

(B) a trap door to which stairs are attached; and

(c) if the door is intended to be used by a person using a mobility aid, meet the requirements set out in clauses 5.2.2(a) and (b) of CSA B651-18.

Operating controls

129 Operating controls on a train must

(a) meet the requirements set out in clauses 4.2.1, 4.2.3 to 4.2.6 and 4.2.8 of CSA B651-18; and

(b) if they are intended to be used by a person using a wheelchair, meet the requirements set out in clause 4.2.2 of CSA B651-18.

Division 3: Marine carriers

Step box

138 A step box that is used to assist a person with a disability to board or disembark from a ferry must

(a) be of sound construction;

(b) have a tread surface that is firm and slip-resistant;

(c) have a glare-free surface; and

(d) have a top outer edge that is marked by a contrasting colour strip that runs the full width of the box.

Mandatory step box

139 A ferry must be equipped with a step box if the riser height of the first or last step of any stairs that are used by passengers to board or disembark is greater than the riser height of the other steps.

Ramp or gangway

140 A ramp or gangway that is used to assist a person with a disability, including a person in a mobility aid, to board or disembark from a ferry must

(a) have a contrasting colour strip that runs the full width of its bottom edge;

(b) have raised edges to prevent a mobility aid from rolling off the edge of the ramp;

(c) have a slip-resistant surface; and

(d) be capable of supporting a minimum weight of 363 kg.

No level boarding

141 If a ferry terminal does not permit level boarding of a ferry, the ferry must have a vehicle deck that is used for the boarding and disembarking of passengers or be equipped with a ramp or gangway.

On-board wheelchair

143 An on-board wheelchair that is available on a ferry must have footrests and wheel locks.

Mandatory on-board wheelchair

144 At least one on-board wheelchair must be available on each deck of a ferry, except a deck that is not accessible to a person using a wheelchair.

Accessible paths of travel

145 (1) A path of travel on a ferry is accessible to persons with disabilities if it meets the requirements set out in subsections (2) and (3) and in clauses 4.4.2, 5.1.1 and 5.1.2 of CSA B651-18.

Hall, path or turning space

(2) If access to the path of travel from an exterior door requires passage through a hall or path or requires a 90-degree or similar turn, then that hall, path or turning space must have a minimum clear width of 1,115 mm and a minimum clear diameter of 1,500 mm.

Aisle width

(3) The aisle width between passenger seats must be sufficient to accommodate an on-board wheelchair.

Mandatory accessible path of travel

146 Every path of travel that is on a ferry and that is intended for use by passengers must be a path of travel that is accessible to persons with disabilities.

Mobility aid space

149 A mobility aid space on a ferry must

(a) have a clear floor area of at least 815 mm by 1,650 mm;

(b) be positioned such that a person using a mobility aid has adequate manoeuvring space to enter it; and

(c) have a table or counter that meets the requirements set out in clauses 6.7.1.2 and 6.7.1.3 of CSA B651-18.

Transfer seat

150 A transfer seat on a ferry must be equipped with a table or counter for food service.

Mandatory mobility aid space and transfer seat

151 (1) A ferry must, in each passenger seating area, have at least two adjacent mobility aid spaces and two adjacent transfer seats.

Food service and lounge areas

(2) A food service area or a lounge area that offers passenger seats must have at least two adjacent mobility aid spaces.

Storage of mobility aids

152 (1) Each deck of a ferry must have a space for the storage of at least one mobility aid.

Protection from damage

(2) A mobility aid must be stored on a ferry in a manner that protects it from damage, including by using an anchoring system or by placing it in an area that is not intended for use by passengers.

Wheelchair-accessible washroom

156 A wheelchair-accessible washroom on a ferry must

(a) meet the requirements set out in clause 6.3 of CSA B651-18, except clause 6.3.1.1(a);

(b) provide a clear area of at least 1,500 mm by 1,500 mm; and

(c) be equipped with at least two call buttons or two other devices for signalling an emergency that meet the requirements set out in paragraph 155(b).

Mandatory wheelchair-accessible washroom

157 If a deck, a food service area or a lounge area of a ferry has one or more washrooms, at least one of them must be a wheelchair-accessible washroom.

Wheelchair-accessible cabin

166 A wheelchair-accessible cabin on a ferry must.

(a) have a clear floor area that meets the requirements set out in clause 4.1(b) of CSA B651-18;

(b) be equipped with operating controls that meet the standards set out in clause 4.2 of CSA B651-18;

(c) meet the requirements set out in clause 4.4.2 of CSA B651-18;

(d) be equipped with an entry door that is identified by the International Symbol of Access and meets the requirements set out in clause 5.2 of CSA B651-18;

(e) be equipped with at least two call buttons or two other devices for signalling an emergency that meet the requirements of paragraph 165(1)(c); and

(f) be adjacent to a wheelchair-accessible washroom or be near a wheelchair-accessible washroom on the same deck.

Mandatory wheelchair-accessible cabin

167 At least five percent of the total number of cabins on the ferry must be wheelchair-accessible and at least two of the wheelchair-accessible cabins must be adjacent to each other.

Wheelchair-accessible shower facility

169 A wheelchair-accessible shower facility on a ferry must

(a) meet the requirements set out in clause 6.5 of CSA B651-18 except clauses 6.5.5.1 and 6.5.5.2;

(b) have an interior clear area of at least 900 mm by 1,500 mm;

(c) have a clear floor area in front of the shower entrance of at least 900 mm by 1,500 mm, with the 1,500 mm dimension parallel to the shower entrance; and

(d) be located on the same deck as a wheelchair-accessible cabin.

Mandatory wheelchair-accessible shower facility

170 A ferry that has a standard shower facility must also have at least one wheelchair-accessible shower facility.

Interior door and doorway

171 (1) An interior door and doorway on a ferry must meet the requirements set out in clauses 5.2.1 and 5.2.6 to 5.2.8 of CSA B651-18.

Requirements

(2) An interior door must

(a) in the case of an automatic or semi-automatic door, incorporate devices that prevent the door from closing while a person is in the doorway and that open and close the door automatically on detecting the movement of a person toward or away from the door;

(b) be marked with visual indicators if 75% of the door’s surface is composed of a transparent material;

(c) in the case of a door to an enclosed space in an area that has no other exit doors, have a safety mechanism that is not a deadbolt and is capable of being manipulated from the outside; and

(d) in the case of a door that is intended for use by a person using a mobility aid, meet the requirements set out in clauses 4.2.2 and 5.2.2 of CSA B651-18.

Exterior door

172 An exterior door on a ferry must

(a) meet the requirements set out in clause 5.2.1 of CSA B651-18;

(b) have a handrail

(i) on each side of the door, fitted internally as close as is feasible to the outer wall of the ferry, or

(ii) on only one side of

(A) a doorway that is fitted with a device for boarding or disembarking, such as a lift, or

(B) a trap door to which stairs are attached; and

(c) if the door is intended to be used by a person using a mobility aid, meet the requirements set out in clauses 5.2.2(a) and (b) of CSA B651-18.

Operating controls

176 Operating controls on a ferry must

(a) meet the requirements set out in clauses 4.2.1, 4.2.3 to 4.2.6 and 4.2.8 of CSA B651-18; and

(b) if they are intended to be used by a person using a wheelchair, meet the requirements set out in clause 4.2.2 of CSA B651-18.

Division 4: Bus carriers

Lift

188 A lift that is used to assist a person with a disability, including a person in a mobility aid, to board or disembark from a bus must

(a) have handrails that are located on both sides of the lift and a slip-resistant surface; and

(b) be capable of supporting a minimum weight of 272 kg.

Ramp or bridge plate

189 A ramp or bridge plate that is used to assist a person with a disability, including a person in a mobility aid, to board or disembark from a bus must

(a) have a contrasting colour strip that runs the full width of its bottom edge;

(b) have raised edges to prevent a mobility aid from rolling off the edge of the ramp;

(c) have a slip-resistant surface; and

(d) be capable of supporting a minimum weight of 272 kg.

No level boarding

190 If a bus terminal does not permit level boarding of a bus and there is no lift, ramp or bridge plate available at the bus terminal, the bus must be equipped with a lift, ramp or bridge plate.

Other stops

191 If a bus makes a stop at any place that is not at a terminal and where passengers are permitted to board and disembark, the bus must be equipped with a lift, ramp or bridge plate.

Mobility aid space

196 A mobility aid space on a bus must have a clear floor area of at least 1,220 mm by 760 mm.

Mandatory mobility aid space

197 A bus must have at least two mobility aid spaces.

Storage of mobility aid

198 A bus must have a baggage compartment that allows for the storage of at least two mobility aids, each of which weighing no more than 227 kg and having a width of no more than 1,092 mm, a height of not more than 736 mm (with the seat and steering column collapsed) and a length of not more than 2,260.6 mm.

Wheelchair-accessible washroom

202 A wheelchair-accessible washroom on a bus must meet the requirements set out in section 201 and must

(a) have a door or other opening to the washroom that has sufficient space in front of it and that is wide enough to allow the entry of a person using a wheelchair;

(b) have sufficient space to allow a person, with assistance, to transfer to and from a wheelchair and the toilet;

(c) have sufficient privacy, including with the use of retractable curtains or walls, to allow a support person or service dog to remain in the washroom with a person using a wheelchair; and

(d) be equipped with faucets that are positioned to be easily usable by a person using a wheelchair.

Mandatory wheelchair-accessible washroom

203 Every washroom on a bus must be a wheelchair-accessible washroom, unless the washroom does not have

(a) a door or other opening to the washroom that has sufficient space in front of it and that is wide enough to allow the entry of a person using a wheelchair; and

(b) sufficient space to allow a person, with assistance, to transfer to and from a wheelchair and the toilet.

Operating controls

209 Operating controls on a bus must

(a) meet the requirements set out in clauses 4.2.1, 4.2.3 to 4.2.6 and 4.2.8 of CSA B651-18; and

(b) if they are intended to be used by a person using a wheelchair, meet the requirements set out in clause 4.2.2 of CSA B651-18.

Part 4 — Requirements applicable to terminal operators

Division 1: Service requirements

Communication of information

215 A terminal operator must publish, including on its website, information about the services or facilities available at the terminal for persons with disabilities, including information about

(a) the curbside zone, including where the curbside zone is located and how to request assistance to or from the curbside zone;

(b) ground transportation from the terminal that is accessible to persons with disabilities, including whether a vehicle that is capable of carrying a non-folding or non-collapsible mobility aid is available;

(c) the location of designated areas for service dogs to relieve themselves;

(d) transportation between facilities within a terminal that is accessible to persons with disabilities; and

(e) wheelchair and electric cart services.

Assistance for persons with disabilities

216 (1) A terminal operator must, on the request of a person with a disability, provide the following services to the person without delay:

(a) assisting the person with their baggage or assisting with a wheelchair, including by providing a wheelchair if needed by the person;

(b) assisting the person to proceed between the general public area and the curbside zone; and

(c) assisting the person to proceed between the curbside zone and the check-in area or, if there is no check-in area, between the curbside zone and a representative of a carrier.

Exception

(2) However, a terminal operator is not required to provide a person with any assistance referred to in subsection (1) if a carrier is already providing that person with that assistance.

Service provider for ground transportation

217 (1) If a terminal operator enters into an agreement or arrangement with any service provider for the provision of ground transportation from the terminal, including by taxi, limousine, bus or rental vehicle, the terminal operator must ensure that the service provider provides transportation that is accessible to persons who are travelling with a mobility aid or any other assistive device or with a service dog, including transportation with vehicles that are capable of carrying non-folding or non-collapsible mobility aids.

Rental vehicles

(2) If a terminal operator enters into an agreement or arrangement with any service provider for the provision of rental vehicles from the terminal, the terminal operator must ensure that the service provider provides rental vehicles that are equipped with hand-control systems.

Division 2: Technical requirements

Terminal — requirements

222 A terminal must meet the requirements set out in CSA B651-18, excluding clauses 5.6.2, 6.5.6, 6.6.2.2, 6.6.2.7.1, 6.7.3, 7 and 8.5 and all Annexes, commentary and figures.

Lift, ramp or stairs — requirements

223 A lift, ramp or stairs that are used at a terminal for the boarding or disembarkation of persons with disabilities must meet the requirements for a lift, ramp or stairs, as the case may be, that are set out in section 69, section 70 or subsection 71(1).

No level boarding — airports

224 In the case of an airport, if the terminal does not permit level boarding of an aircraft, the terminal must be equipped with a lift, a ramp or portable stairs.

Part 5 — Requirements applicable to CATSA and CBSA

Security screening

Assistive device, support person or service dog

233 (1) CATSA must, when screening a person with a disability who uses an assistive device or who is travelling with a support person or a service dog, make a reasonable effort to carry out the screening simultaneously with the screening of the person’s assistive device, support person or service dog, as the case may be.

Separate screening of assistive device

(2) If CATSA removes an assistive device from a person with a disability for a separate screening, CATSA must immediately return the assistive device to the person after it has been screened.or service dog, as the case may be.

Separate screening of mobility aid

(3) If CATSA removes an assistive device that is a mobility aid from a person with a disability for a separate screening, CATSA must offer a chair to the person while the mobility aid is being screened.

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