Departmental Plan 2018-2019

Table of Contents

Message from the Chair and Chief Executive Officer

The 2018-19 fiscal year will be busy and interesting for the Canadian Transportation Agency (CTA), Canada's longest-standing independent, expert regulator and tribunal.

The CTA's Regulatory Modernization Initiative, launched in May 2016, will produce updated regulations that reflect current and emerging business models, user expectations, and best practices in the regulatory field.  Consultations have been completed on a comprehensive set of accessible transportation regulations and on regulations related to air licencing and charters.  The initiation of consultations on air passenger protection regulations and on rail transportation regulations is pending parliamentary consideration of the Transportation Modernization Act (Bill C-49).

If and when Bill C-49 is passed, it will also have implications for the CTA's regulatory determination and dispute resolution services.  Of note is the Bill's proposal to create a new mechanism called long-haul interswitching (LHI), which will increase choice for shippers served by a single class 1 railway company.  The LHI provisions, which have generated significant discussion among stakeholders, require that the CTA render decisions within 30 business days.  We are putting the pieces in place to ensure that we can meet this standard.

At the same time, we will need to ensure that sufficient capacity and streamlined processes are in place to handle a growing number of air travel complaints.  During the 2013-2015 period, we received about 800 complaints per year.  That number has risen seven-fold since fall 2016, when we undertook modest public information efforts to ensure that travellers are aware that they have rights if they experience a flight disruption, and that the CTA can help if a concern cannot be resolved directly with an airline. 

With respect to the CTA's accessible transportation mandate, our vision is for Canada's national transportation system to be the most accessible in the world.  One action that we will take in 2018-19 to advance that vision is convening a multi-stakeholder forum on the storage and transportation of mobility aids on aircraft, an issue that is becoming increasingly pressing as the size and complexity of devices such as wheelchairs and scooters grows.

Finally, the CTA will, in the coming year, move towards implementation of a more data-driven, risk-based approach to targeting its compliance monitoring and enforcement activities.

These developments combined with our core services make for a very full agenda.  The CTA's professional, dedicated, and energetic team of Members and public servants is committed to delivering that agenda – and in so doing, making important contributions to the economic and social well-being of Canadians.

Scott Streiner
Chair and Chief Executive Officer

Plans at a glance

The Canadian Transportation Agency (CTA) is guided by its strategic priorities for the 2017-2020 period:

Strategic Priorities 2017-2020

A modern framework

Legislation, regulations and guidance material that reflect current and emerging business models, travellers' and shippers' needs, and best practices in the adjudicative and regulatory fields

Excellence in service delivery

Timely, fair, and effective services in the areas of regulatory determination, dispute resolution, and compliance monitoring and enforcement, based on the evidence, the letter and purpose of the legislation and regulations, and relevant jurisprudence

Stakeholder and public awareness

Clear, relevant information for stakeholders and the general public on the national transportation system, the rights and responsibilities of transportation providers and users, and Agency services

A healthy, high-performing organization

Independent ۰ Expert ۰ Impartial ۰ Engaged ۰ Agile ۰ Innovative

To fulfill its core responsibility:

Independent regulatory and dispute-resolution services for transportation providers and users

To deliver results, in alignment with its three mandates:

  • An efficient, competitive national transportation system
  • Accessible transportation services for persons with disabilities
  • Consumer protection for air travellers

For more information on the CTA’s plans, priorities and planned results, see the “Planned results” section of this report.

Planned results: what we want to achieve this year and beyond

Core Responsibility

Independent regulatory and dispute-resolution services for transportation providers and users

Description

Set and enforce economic, accessibility, and air passenger protection rules for the national transportation system; resolve disputes between transportation service providers and users through facilitation, mediation, arbitration, and adjudication; and provide information to stakeholders and the general public on the transportation system and their transportation-related rights and responsibilities.

Planning highlights

The CTA will undertake the following activities to support its planned results:

  • Continue the modernization process of the regulations it administers to ensure that they are clear and reflect current business models, user expectations and best practices. Specifically for 2018-19, the CTA will:
    • Develop a comprehensive set of accessibility regulations that replaces the current patchwork of regulations and voluntary codes, encourages transportation service providers to plan and train their personnel for accessibility accordingly, and leaves scope for innovation.
    • Update the Air Transportation Regulations to simplify and clarify requirements with regard to charters, licensing, and insurance.
    • Consolidate rail regulations to eliminate duplication and obsolete requirements.
  • Implement new responsibilities if and when Bill C-49 receives Royal Assent, including development of air passenger protection regulations that will set out the minimum obligations of airlines to passengers in a range of situations.
  • Make it easier for Canadians to access the CTA's services by streamlining dispute resolution and regulatory determination processes.
  • Continue the development of a data-driven, risk-based approach to compliance monitoring and enforcement.
  • Continue to raise awareness among service providers and the public on their transportation-related rights and responsibilities, and Agency recourses available to them.
Planned results
Departmental Results Departmental Result Indicators Target Date to achieve target 2014–15 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results 2016–17 Actual results
An efficient, competitive national transportation system Transportation Fluidity Index Obtain baseline information (2019) TBD Not available Not available Not available
Percentage of regulatory authorities issued, and disputes and contested determination cases resolved within service standards 85%Note 1 March 2019 93% 95% 92%
Percentage of transportation service providers that comply with legislative and regulatory requirements 80%Note 1 March 2019 Not available Not available Not available
Accessible transportation services for persons with disabilities Percentage of air, rail, marine carriers and facility operators complying with accessibility related legislative and regulatory requirements and codes of practice 80% March 2019 Not available Not available Not available
Percentage of accessibility disputes resolved within service standards 80% March 2019 100% 98% 89%
Consumer protection for air travellers Percentage of air carriers complying with consumer protection legislative and regulatory requirements Obtain baseline information (2019) TBD Not available Not available Not available
Percentage of air consumer protection disputes resolved within service standards 85% March 2019 Not available Not available Not available
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2018–19
Main Estimates
2018–19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
2020-21
Planned spending
20,219,970 20,217,970 20,046,417 20,046,417
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2018–19
Planned full-time equivalents
2019–20
Planned full-time equivalents
2020–21
Planned full-time equivalents
168 168 168

Financial, human resources and performance information for the CTA’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct service categories that support Program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. The 10 service categories are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; and Acquisition Services.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2018–19
Main Estimates
2018–19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
2020-21
Planned spending
11,170,150 11,170,150 7,584,757 7,584,757
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2018–19
Planned full-time equivalents
2019–20
Planned full-time equivalents
2020–21
Planned full-time equivalents
55 55 55

Spending and human resources

Planned spending

Departmental spending trend graph
  • Details
    Departmental Spending Trend Graph ($ thousands)
      2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020 2020-2021
    Postes législatifs 3,231 3,079 3,199 3,173 3,173 3,173
    Crédits votés 25,023 23,869 26,441 28,215 24,458 24,458
    Total 28,254 26,948 29,640 31,388 27,631 27,631
Budgetary planning summary for Core Responsibility and Internal Services (dollars)
Core Responsibility and Internal Services 2015–16
Expenditures
2016-17
Expenditures
2017-18
Forecast spending
2018-19
Main Estimates
2018–19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
2020-21
Planned spending
Independent regulatory and dispute-resolution services for transportation providers and users 21,434,438 19,539,045 21,824,523 20,217,970 20,217,970 20,046,417 20,046,417
Internal Services 6,819,794 7,409,032 7,815,911 11,170,150 11,170,150 7,584,757 7,584,757
Total 28,254,232 26,948,077 29,640,434 31,388,120 31,388,120 27,631,174 27,631,174

The increase in Internal Services expenditures in 2018-19 includes an allocation of $3.5 million for a mandatory government initiative (Government of Canada Fit-up Standards) to make more efficient use of office space.

 

2018–19 Budgetary planned gross spending summary (dollars)
Core Responsibility and Internal Services 2018–19
Planned gross spending
2018–19
Planned gross spending in specified purpose accounts
2018–19
Planned revenues netted against expenditures
2018–19
Planned net spending
Independent regulatory and dispute-resolution services for transportation providers and users 20,217,970 N/A N/A 20,217,970
Internal Services 11,170,150 N/A N/A 11,170,150
Total 31,388,120 N/A N/A 31,388,120

Planned human resources

Human resources planning summary for Core Responsibility and Internal Services (full-time equivalents)
Core Responsibility and Internal Services 2015-16 Actual 2016-17 Actual

2017-18 Forecast

2018-19 Planned

2019-20 Planned 2020-21 Planned
Independent regulatory and dispute-resolution services for transportation providers and users 165 162 169 168 168 168
Internal Services 64 58 55 55 55 55
Total 229 220 224 223 223 223

As a result of unchanged budget allocations for the CTA, human resource levels remain similar.

Estimates by vote

For information on the CTA’s organizational appropriations, consult the 2018–19 Main Estimates.

Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations

The Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations provides a general overview of the CTA’s operations. The forecast of financial information on expenses and revenues is prepared on an accrual accounting basis to strengthen accountability and to improve transparency and financial management.

Because the Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations is prepared on an accrual accounting basis, and the forecast and planned spending amounts presented in other sections of the Departmental Plan are prepared on an expenditure basis, amounts may differ.

A more detailed Future-Oriented Statement of Operations and associated notes, including a reconciliation of the net cost of operations to the requested authorities, are available on the CTA’s website.

Future Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations for the year ended March 31, 2019 (dollars)
Financial information 2017–18
Forecast results
2018–19
Planned results
Difference
(2018–19 Planned
results minus
2017–18
Forecast results)
Total expenses 33,487,895 31,898,592 (1,589,303)
Total revenues - - -
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 33,487,895 31,898,592 (1,589,303)

The variance between 2017–18 forecast results and 2018–19 planned results is largely due to the financial impact of the signing of several collective agreements and retroactive payments for three prior years occurring in 2017-18.

Supplementary information

Corporate information

Organizational profile

Appropriate minister[s]: The Honourable Marc Garneau, P.C, M.P., Minister of Transport

Institutional head: Scott Streiner, Chair and Chief Executive Officer

Ministerial portfolio: Transport

Enabling instrument[s]: Canada Transportation Act, S.C. 1996, c. 10, as amended

Year of incorporation / commencement: 1904

Other:

The CTA shares responsibility for the following Acts:

  • Access to Information Act, R.S.C., 1985, c. A-1
  • Canada Marine Act, S.C., 1998, c. 10
  • Civil Air Navigation Services Commercialization Act, S.C., 1996, c. 20
  • Coasting Trade Act, S.C., 1992, c. 31
  • Energy Supplies Emergency Act, R.S.C., 1985, c. E-9
  • Financial Administration Act, R.S.C., 1985, c. F-11
  • Official Languages Act, R.S.C, 1985, c. 31 (4th Supp.)
  • Pilotage Act, R.S.C., 1985, c. P-14
  • Privacy Act, R.S.C., 1985, c. P-21
  • Public Service Modernization Act, S.C., 2003, c. 22
  • Railway Relocation and Crossing Act, R.S.C., 1985, c. R-4
  • Railway Safety Act, R.S.C., 1985, c. 32 (4th Supp.)
  • Shipping Conferences Exemption Act, 1987, R.S.C., 1985, c. 17 (3rd Supp.)

The CTA has sole responsibility for the following regulations:

  • Air Transportation Regulations, SOR/88-58
  • Canadian Transportation Agency Designated Provisions Regulations, SOR/99-244
  • Regulations on Operational Terms for Rail Level of Service Arbitration, SOR/2014-192
  • Personnel Training for the Assistance of Persons with Disabilities Regulations, SOR/94-42
  • Railway Costing Regulations, SOR /80-310
  • Railway Interswitching Regulations, SOR/88-41
  • Railway Third Party Liability Insurance Coverage Regulations, SOR/96-337
  • Railway Traffic and Passenger Tariffs Regulations, SOR/96-338
  • Railway Traffic Liability Regulations, SOR/91-448

The CTA has promulgated the following Rules:

  • Canadian Transportation Agency Rules (Dispute Proceedings and Certain Rules Applicable to All Proceedings), SOR/2014-104
  • Rules of Procedure for Rail Level of Service Arbitration, SOR/2014-94

The CTA shares responsibility for the following regulations:

  • Transportation Information Regulations, SOR/96-334
  • Railway Company Pay Out of Excess Revenue for the Movement of Grain Regulations, SOR/2001-207
  • The Jacques-Cartier and Champlain Bridges Inc. Regulations, SOR/98-568
  • The Seaway International Bridge Corporation, Ltd. Regulations, SOR/98-569

These Acts and Regulations are available on the Department of Justice website, and are accessible through the "Acts and Regulations" section of the CTA website.

Raison d’être, mandate and role

“Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do” is available on the CTA’s website.

Operating context and key risks

Information on operating context and key risks is available on the CTA’s website.

Reporting framework

The CTA’s Departmental Results Framework and Program Inventory of record for 2018–19 are shown below:

Core Responsibility

Independent regulatory and dispute-resolution services for transportation providers and users

Description

Set and enforce economic, accessibility, and air passenger protection rules for the national transportation system; resolve disputes between transportation service providers and users through facilitation, mediation, arbitration, and adjudication; and provide information to stakeholders and Canadians in general on the transportation system and their transportation-related rights and responsibilities.

Results and indicators
Result 1: An efficient, competitive national transportation system

Indicators

1A   Transportation Fluidity Index

1B   Percentage of regulatory authorities issued, and disputes and contested determination cases resolved within service standards

1C   Percentage of transportation service providers that comply with legislative and regulatory requirements

Result 2: Accessible transportation services for persons with disabilities

Indicators

2A   Percentage of air, rail, marine carriers and facility operators complying with accessibility-related legislative and regulatory requirements and codes of practice

2B   Percentage of accessibility disputes resolved within service standards

Result 3: Consumer protection for air travellers

Indicators

3A   Percentage of air carriers complying with consumer protection legislative and regulatory requirements

3B   Percentage of air consumer protection disputes resolved within service standards

Program Inventory
  • Analysis and Outreach
  • Dispute Resolution
  • Determinations and Compliance
  • Internal Services

Concordance between the Departmental Results Framework and the Program Inventory, 2018–19, and the Program Alignment Architecture, 2017–18

The Departmental Results Framework aligns with a change implemented in 2016 establishing a specialized Analysis and Outreach branch. This had not been reflected in the Program Alignment Architecture.

Independent regulatory and dispute-resolution services for transportation providers and users
2018–19 Core Responsibility and Program Inventory 2017–18 Lowest-level program of the Program Alignment Architecture Percentage of lowest-level Program Alignment Architecture program (dollars) corresponding to the program in the Program Inventory
Analysis and Outreach 1.1.1 Economic Regulation 32
1.1.2 Adjudication and Alternative Dispute Resolution 11
1.1.3 Internal Services 2
Dispute Resolution 1.1.1 Economic Regulation 0
1.1.2 Adjudication and Alternative Dispute Resolution 87
1.1.3 Internal Services 0
Determinations and Compliance 1.1.1 Economic Regulation 66
1.1.2 Adjudication and Alternative Dispute Resolution 0
1.1.3 Internal Services 0
Internal Services 1.1.1 Economic Regulation 2
1.1.2 Adjudication and Alternative Dispute Resolution 2
1.1.3 Internal Services 98

Supporting information on the Program Inventory

Supporting information on planned expenditures, human resources, and results related to the CTA’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Supplementary information tables

The following supplementary information tables are available on the CTA’s website:

Federal tax expenditures

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures each year in the Report on Federal Tax Expenditures. This report also provides detailed background information on tax expenditures, including descriptions, objectives, historical information and references to related federal spending programs. The tax measures presented in this report are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational contact information

Canadian Transportation Agency
15 Eddy Street
Gatineau, Quebec
K1A 0N9

Tel.: 1-888-222-2592
Fax.: 819-997-6727
TTY: 1-800-669-5575

Email : info@otc-cta.gc.ca

Annex: definitions

appropriation (crédit)
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires)
Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.
Core Responsibility (responsabilité essentielle)
An enduring function or role performed by a department. The intentions of the department with respect to a Core Responsibility are reflected in one or more related Departmental Results that the department seeks to contribute to or influence.
Departmental Plan (plan ministériel)
A report on the plans and expected performance of appropriated departments over a three-year period. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.
Departmental Result (résultat ministériel)
Any change or changes that the department seeks to influence. A Departmental Result is often outside departments’ immediate control, but it should be influenced by Program-level outcomes.
Departmental Result Indicator (indicateur de résultat ministériel)
A factor or variable that provides a valid and reliable means to measure or describe progress on a Departmental Result.
Departmental Results Framework (cadre ministériel des résultats)
The department’s Core Responsibilities, Departmental Results and Departmental Result Indicators.
Departmental Results Report (rapport sur les résultats ministériels)
A report on the actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.
experimentation (expérimentation)
Activities that seek to explore, test and compare the effects and impacts of policies, interventions and approaches, to inform evidence-based decision-making, by learning what works and what does not.
full-time equivalent (équivalent temps plein)
A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charge against a departmental budget. Full-time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.
gender-based analysis plus (GBA+) (analyse comparative entre les sexes plus [ACS+])
An analytical process used to help identify the potential impacts of policies, Programs and services on diverse groups of women, men and gender-diverse people. The “plus” acknowledges that GBA goes beyond sex and gender differences to consider multiple identity factors that intersect to make people who they are (such as race, ethnicity, religion, age, and mental or physical disability).
government-wide priorities (priorités pangouvernementales)
For the purpose of the 2018–19 Departmental Plan, government-wide priorities refers to those high-level themes outlining the government’s agenda in the 2015 Speech from the Throne, namely: Growth for the Middle Class; Open and Transparent Government; A Clean Environment and a Strong Economy; Diversity is Canada's Strength; and Security and Opportunity.
horizontal initiative (initiative horizontale)
An initiative in which two or more federal organizations, through an approved funding agreement, work toward achieving clearly defined shared outcomes, and which has been designated (by Cabinet, a central agency, etc.) as a horizontal initiative for managing and reporting purposes.
non-budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires)
Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.
performance (rendement)
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.
performance indicator (indicateur de rendement)
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.
performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement)
The process of communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.
planned spending (dépenses prévues)
For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts presented in the Main Estimates.
A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.
plan (plan)
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.
priority (priorité)
A plan or project that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Departmental Results.
Program (programme)
Individual or groups of services, activities or combinations thereof that are managed together within the department and focus on a specific set of outputs, outcomes or service levels.
Program Alignment Architecture (architecture d’alignement des programmes)
A structured inventory of an organization’s programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.
results (résultat)
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization’s influence.
statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives)
Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.
Strategic Outcome (résultat stratégique)
A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization’s mandate, vision and core functions.
program (programme temporisé)
A time-limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.
target (cible)
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.
voted expenditures (dépenses votées)
Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.
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